Showing posts tagged gadgets

kenyatta:

Faraday Bag hides your gadgets from the networks trying to connect to them

Two months ago I saw James Bridle give a talk where he asked whether our algorithms are trying to talk to us. I immediately wondered what would happen if all of our iPhones suddenly became sentient and went on strike. How would they spend that time? Could they take a vacation from all of that connectivity? I guess this bag answers that question for me:

In the book ‘In Pursuit of Silence’ George Prochnik searches for the true meaning of silence. When he asks astronaut Suni Williams about the commonly assumed ‘silence’ of space she tells him space is not at all silent: Houston is always telling you to “do this and don’t do that”.

Williams “Reflecting back, there was one time I remember being quiet in space. We were out on a spacewalk and were asked to wait for the night pass to go through.” (The night-pass is the forty-five minutes out of its ninety-minute orbit when the spacecraft is on the dark side of the planet.) “While we were waiting the chatter from Houston died down, then cut out altogether. So we were just waiting there, quiet, just hearing ourselves breathe out there at the end of the station, and it was like putting on a pair of glasses… You could see the stats really bright. You could see the depth of space.”

Inspired by Suni Williams, I’ve commissioned a series of prototypic Faraday Bags, These Faraday Bags are democratic instruments for data-silence in space: if you put your communication device in, you will experience data-silence. This might prove very handy on earth as well…

slavin:

Via dashboard, I saw this on Kars’ tumblr sometime around 4PM yesterday. I took a nap, went to dinner and not two hours later found myself sitting opposite Sarah, sitting there with the Faraday bag she made.

It’s not the strangest, or the best, thing that happened yesterday, but it’s up there.

karsalfrink:

(via Sarah van Sonsbeeck, artist)

Not too long ago I read Charles Stross’s Glasshouse, in which a faraday bag figures heavily. Leave it to artists like Sarah to make sci-fi a reality.

(Reblogged from kenyatta)